Now With More Than 3000 Reviews! Go Nuts - Read 'Em All!!

WELCOME! Use the search engines on this site (or your own off-site engine of choice) to gain easy access to the complete MAKSQUIBS Archive; over 2500 posts and counting. (New posts added every day or so.)

You can check on all our titles by typing the Title, Director, Actor or 'Keyword' of your choice in the Search Engine of your choice (include the phrase MAKSQUIBS) or just use the BLOGGER Search Box at the top left corner of the page.

Feel free to place comments directly on any of the film posts and to test your film knowledge with the CONTESTS scattered here & there. (Hey! No Googling allowed. They're pretty easy.)

Send E-mails to MAKSQUIBS@yahoo.com . (Let us know if the TRANSLATE WIDGET works!) Or use the Profile Page or Comments link for contact.

Thanks for stopping by.

Thursday, May 29, 2008

QUEEN CHRISTINA (1933)


Director Rouben Mamoulian ’s leading ladies in the 1930s were (in order of appearance) Sylvia Sidney, Miriam Hopkins, Jeanette MacDonald, Marlene Dietrich, Greta Garbo, Anna Sten (Sam Goldwyn 's try for a Garbo/Dietrich of his very own), Miriam Hopkins (again), Ida Lupino, Irene Dunne & finally Barbara Stanwyck. Has another director ever had such a line-up of consecutive female stars? This is Garbo’s first talkie to have pace, humor & compositional sophistication. It also boasts a fitting story for its star: a 'manish' Swedish Queen becomes a flesh & blood human being by finding and then losing love. The production can’t sidestep the usual M-G-M glossy demerits, but everyone’s at their best, especially stalwart supporting regulars C. Aubrey Smith & Lewis Stone. Why even Herbert Stothart ’s score helps things along. The line readings from the fast-fading John Gilbert are a bit too dynamic at times, but he's deeply touching in his death scene, as if he knew his time in the sun was up. It’s a memorable film. Try to see this on the biggest video display you can get your hands on for the famous final shot to make its full effect. On the big screen, it's overwhelming.

No comments: