Now With More Than 3000 Reviews! Go Nuts - Read 'Em All!!

WELCOME! Use the search engines on this site (or your own off-site engine of choice) to gain easy access to the complete MAKSQUIBS Archive; over 2500 posts and counting. (New posts added every day or so.)

You can check on all our titles by typing the Title, Director, Actor or 'Keyword' of your choice in the Search Engine of your choice (include the phrase MAKSQUIBS) or just use the BLOGGER Search Box at the top left corner of the page.

Feel free to place comments directly on any of the film posts and to test your film knowledge with the CONTESTS scattered here & there. (Hey! No Googling allowed. They're pretty easy.)

Send E-mails to MAKSQUIBS@yahoo.com . (Let us know if the TRANSLATE WIDGET works!) Or use the Profile Page or Comments link for contact.

Thanks for stopping by.

Monday, June 2, 2008

THE GIRL NEXT DOOR (1953)

This chamber-sized musical isn’t the usual Techni-colorful backstage bio-pic from 20th/Fox, but an imaginative & nicely observed story about a widowed father (Dan Dailey) & son (Billy Gray, the talented kid from THE DAY THE EARTH STOOD STILL/’51) who find their well-adjusted bachelor lifestyle under libidinal attack when sexy nightclub star June Haver moves in next door. Dad’s a cartoonist, so we even get a couple of U.P.A. cartoon segments in addition to a full-fledged dream ballet. If only the execution matched the ambitious ideas, this might really be something to cheer. But the songs are boilerplate, the clever ideas aren’t properly developed and a subsidiary couple (played by Jack Benny ’s house tenor Dennis Day & Cara Williams) add little while taking time & attention away from the fear of commitment & childhood anxiety issues the script feints at digging into. Dailey is always worth watching, the only ‘big lug’ song-and-dance star, and he shares the best number (a tricky kitchen clean-up routine) with Gray. But who the hell had the idea of having the kid running around during the dream ballet and splitting up his Dad & would-be lover with a giant pencil? Did Sigmund Freud do a rewrite on this?

No comments: