Now With More Than 3000 Reviews! Go Nuts - Read 'Em All!!

WELCOME! Use the search engines on this site (or your own off-site engine of choice) to gain easy access to the complete MAKSQUIBS Archive; over 2500 posts and counting. (New posts added every day or so.)

You can check on all our titles by typing the Title, Director, Actor or 'Keyword' of your choice in the Search Engine of your choice (include the phrase MAKSQUIBS) or just use the BLOGGER Search Box at the top left corner of the page.

Feel free to place comments directly on any of the film posts and to test your film knowledge with the CONTESTS scattered here & there. (Hey! No Googling allowed. They're pretty easy.)

Send E-mails to MAKSQUIBS@yahoo.com . (Let us know if the TRANSLATE WIDGET works!) Or use the Profile Page or Comments link for contact.

Thanks for stopping by.

Monday, September 15, 2014

MISS GRANT GOES TO THE DOOR (1940)

This Public Service short from WWII Great Britain is a small gem, a pocket-sized Hitchcockian thriller about a pair of tough-minded spinsters whose smart thinking stops a Nazi invasion in its tracks. (Three guaranteed shocks on a seven minute running time.)

A quick look at the credits explains much: helmed by Brian Desmond Hurst (A CHRISTMAS CAROL/’51), with a story by Thorold Dickinson (the original GASLIGHT/’40; the even better QUEEN OF SPADES/’49). You may also recognize the great eccentric Martita Hunt, playing the less courageous of the two bitties, as Miss Havisham in David Lean’s GREAT EXPECTATIONS/’46 even if IMDb doesn’t. (They've misspelled her name ‘Marita’ so no other credits come up.) But you may not recognize the name of film editor Ralph Kemplen, a regular for John Huston (AFRICAN QUEEN/51) and Fred Zinnemann (DAY OF THE JACKAL/’73). The amount of rural/small town atmosphere, quirky narrative & suspense this choice, talented group manages to squeeze into a 7 minute running time is damn impressive. Watch it for free here: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/1060021651 The print’s a little beat up and THE IMPERIAL MUSEUM is burnt into the middle of the image, but it just adds to the period flavor. Enjoy!

READ ALL ABOUT IT: Kudos to British Film Guide maven Leslie Halliwell who mentions this forgotten treasure in his personal memoir of growing up at the cinema SEATS IN ALL PARTS.

DOUBLE-BILL: Constance Bennett & Gracie Fields take on Nazis in Paris, but with glamour in the zippy, if not wholly successful feature MADAME PIMPERNEL (aka: PARIS UNDERGROUND)/’45.

No comments: