Now With More Than 3000 Reviews! Go Nuts - Read 'Em All!!

WELCOME! Use the search engines on this site (or your own off-site engine of choice) to gain easy access to the complete MAKSQUIBS Archive; over 2500 posts and counting. (New posts added every day or so.)

You can check on all our titles by typing the Title, Director, Actor or 'Keyword' of your choice in the Search Engine of your choice (include the phrase MAKSQUIBS) or just use the BLOGGER Search Box at the top left corner of the page.

Feel free to place comments directly on any of the film posts and to test your film knowledge with the CONTESTS scattered here & there. (Hey! No Googling allowed. They're pretty easy.)

Send E-mails to MAKSQUIBS@yahoo.com . (Let us know if the TRANSLATE WIDGET works!) Or use the Profile Page or Comments link for contact.

Thanks for stopping by.

Monday, June 2, 2008

THE STRANGER WORE A GUN (1953)

Originally shot in 3-D by one-eyed megger Andre De Toth (tons of stuff thrown right at us!), this is a shabby, off-key Western that pushes the limits of our identification with its protagonist, played stiffly by Randolph Scott . The usual structure for one of these stranger-comes-to-town Westerns is careful to barely sketch in the murky, sometimes unsavory backstory that led to all that wandr'ing. Here, it’s all uncomfortably played out for us in the prologue. And its not a pretty picture. In fact, Scott keeps to his bad ways and only redeems himself (partially, I’d say) at the very end. It’s different, but was it intentional? We’re left in a most uncomfortable position as he pulls out of town with the equally culpable gambling lady, Claire Trevor. Even with George Macready, Lee Marvin, Ernest Borgnine & the other baddies put in their place, it all leaves a nasty taste. Scott capitalized on this type of character drama in the remarkable series of little morality plays he would start to make with Budd Boeticher a few years later, but this attempt doesn't come off.

No comments: